oswald-fortheos-win:

hottiesinpurgatory:

faeryhearts:

In the Victorian era, hand-fans were used not only to cool oneself but also as a secret way to communicate the language of love. For example, by running one’s fingers through the fan’s ribs, one is trying to say, "I want to talk to you." The enigmatic language of the fan was widely used by both men and women.I. A fan placed near the heart."You have won my love."II. A closed fan touching the right eye."When may I be allowed to see you?"III. A closed fan moved threateningly."Do not act so impudently!"IV. A half-opened fan pressed to the lips."You may kiss me."V. Covering the left ear with an open fan."Do not betray my secret."VI. Hiding the eyes behind an open fan."I love you."VII. Shutting a fully open fan slowly."I promise to marry you."VIII. Fanning oneself slowly."I am married."IX. Letting one’s fan rest on the right cheek or the left."Yes" and "No", interchangeably.X. Opening and closing the fan several times."You are cruel."XI. Fan in front of the face."Follow me."XII. Twirling the fan in the left hand."We are being watched."XIII. Fan held over left ear."I wish to be rid of you."XIV. Carrying an open fan in the left hand."Come and talk to me."XV. Opening a fan wide."Wait for me."XVI. Placing the fan behind the head with finger."Goodbye."[Artwork: Secret, by Lee Yun-hi.]

WHAT IF YOU WERE JUST HOLDING A FAN AND NOT TRYING TO SAY ANYTHING BUT YOU ACTUALLY PROMISED SOME GUY YOU’D MARRY HIM

[I WANT THIS AU PLEASE?]

oswald-fortheos-win:

hottiesinpurgatory:

faeryhearts:

In the Victorian era, hand-fans were used not only to cool oneself but also as a secret way to communicate the language of love. For example, by running one’s fingers through the fan’s ribs, one is trying to say, "I want to talk to you." The enigmatic language of the fan was widely used by both men and women.

I. A fan placed near the heart.
"You have won my love."

II. A closed fan touching the right eye.
"When may I be allowed to see you?"

III. A closed fan moved threateningly.
"Do not act so impudently!"

IV. A half-opened fan pressed to the lips.
"You may kiss me."

V. Covering the left ear with an open fan.
"Do not betray my secret."

VI. Hiding the eyes behind an open fan.
"I love you."

VII. Shutting a fully open fan slowly.
"I promise to marry you."

VIII. Fanning oneself slowly.
"I am married."

IX. Letting one’s fan rest on the right cheek or the left.
"Yes" and "No", interchangeably.

X. Opening and closing the fan several times.
"You are cruel."

XI. Fan in front of the face.
"Follow me."

XII. Twirling the fan in the left hand.
"We are being watched."

XIII. Fan held over left ear.
"I wish to be rid of you."

XIV. Carrying an open fan in the left hand.
"Come and talk to me."

XV. Opening a fan wide.
"Wait for me."

XVI. Placing the fan behind the head with finger.
"Goodbye."

[Artwork: Secret, by Lee Yun-hi.]

WHAT IF YOU WERE JUST HOLDING A FAN AND NOT TRYING TO SAY ANYTHING BUT YOU ACTUALLY PROMISED SOME GUY YOU’D MARRY HIM

[I WANT THIS AU PLEASE?]

(via onlymapaches)

(Source: tan-aka, via onlymapaches)

gymleaderkyle:

then where the hell tHAT BITCH GOING

gymleaderkyle:

then where the hell tHAT BITCH GOING

(via serkestic)

follow for NSFW

konkeydongcountry:

image

nice, smart frog wisdom is something everyone needs

(via itsyamtastic)

[listen]

(Source: agenderkou, via onlymapaches)

alliartist:

thisisbennett:

Pacific Rim Bomber Jackets (X)

Allison

image

(Source: setsailslash, via onlymapaches)

314eater:

prevalere:

you know how in some movies the bride/groom calls off the wedding to be with the person they truly love and then they live happily ever after well it’s pretty shitty that the person they were getting married to doesn’t actually get a happy ending but no one seems to care about it to the point that he/she is not even mentioned afterwards as if that person didn’t exist or had feelings at all yeah just a thought

Lord farquaad will be okay

(Source: prevalere, via onlymapaches)

akycha:

shastafirecracker:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

I knew this and this is why my mom and I have called doorways “lobotomy arches” for years

I love having an explanation for Doorway Effect, but sometimes I really want to re-engineer my brain, because it makes me feel as stupid as all get out.

akycha:

shastafirecracker:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

I knew this and this is why my mom and I have called doorways “lobotomy arches” for years

I love having an explanation for Doorway Effect, but sometimes I really want to re-engineer my brain, because it makes me feel as stupid as all get out.

(via natroze)

hayleybjames:

Physically accurate fanservice with gorgeous animation is the best.

hayleybjames:

Physically accurate fanservice with gorgeous animation is the best.

(via yaoi-is-totally-canon)

Tags: Free!

islandtyphoon:

the best 12 seconds of the entire high school musical trilogy

(Source: flint-you-have-a-call, via zeekubeast)

Tags: hsm